Survivor Therapist

Remember, you – the consumer therapeutic services. If you are not assigned by the court for the therapy you have the absolute right to start and stop treatment when you want and with whom you want. It’s believed that Asana sees a great future in this idea. Persistence, that is it when you talk about what you think, getting what is right for you, and, in general, a statement of your rights – it is often difficult area for survivors. I think that the survivor who tells the therapist that he did not feel that their relationship or therapy can help, makes positive step in the direction of perseverance. This is especially important if the therapist acts healthy. Sometimes therapists are caught in their own issues and project them on the client. The problems you are working on, can hurt the old, unresolved problems in the life of the therapist. Remember that you pay the therapist.

If he needs to work on his personal issues he needs to pay someone for therapy for him. Some signs that can be seen if such event occurs, include excessive emotionality of the therapist in regard to certain aspects of your situation. I'm not saying that the therapist should be passive and cold, but if it seems uncharacteristically interested, unobservant or upset because of something you said – beware. Also, if he really wants you to do something, for example to forgive the person who abused you – it may mean that he has a personal problem. If he begins to share with you information more personal than the one that interests you, or you can listen comfortably – it could be a sign indicating its unresolved problems.